Der Schiffsjunge: Die wahre Geschichte der Meuterei auf

Der Schiffsjunge: Die wahre Geschichte der Meuterei auf der Bounty This book had me intriguedthan I would have thought after holding it in my hands for the first of many times and has lead me to write my first review here Not only is the protagonist very likeable, but also has the crew s voyage been described in a very detailed and enthralling way.The first part was used to introduce the protagonist, John Jacob Turnstile It needed the second part, the voyage by ship, to get me invested though The author was capable of telling this story by brutally d This book had me intriguedthan I would have thought after holding it in my hands for the first of many times and has lead me to write my first review here Not only is the protagonist very likeable, but also has the crew s voyage been described in a very detailed and enthralling way.The first part was used to introduce the protagonist, John Jacob Turnstile It needed the second part, the voyage by ship, to get me invested though The author was capable of telling this story by brutally describing the sailor s deeds, while also captivating an intriguing atmosphere and creating vibrant, divisive characters The third part dealt with a lot of sexual allusions, also including a love story with too many sex scenes as every single sailor was characterized as if nobody of them could resist his sexual desires The story later became a lotexciting than in the third part, culminating in an explosive last part.The reader shouldn t have weak nerves to read such a book, as it deals very detailed and brutally with the mutiny of the Bounty The book establishes the main conflicts very elaborately and hence cannot be read in only some hours But it has easily turned into one of my favourite books, so I can just as easily recommend this lecture to everyone else This was truly one of the best books I have ever read Probably the number one reason it was was because of the language that John Boyne used to tell the story It is told from the perspective of a 14 year old boy who is put on the Bounty as payment for petty crimes And his voice is HILARIOUS and just so unique I m not sure if the author researched the time and certain word usage from then or if he invented such words as scut or motions But not just the WORDS also the PHRASING were incr This was truly one of the best books I have ever read Probably the number one reason it was was because of the language that John Boyne used to tell the story It is told from the perspective of a 14 year old boy who is put on the Bounty as payment for petty crimes And his voice is HILARIOUS and just so unique I m not sure if the author researched the time and certain word usage from then or if he invented such words as scut or motions But not just the WORDS also the PHRASING were incredible This book took me forever to read because I did not want it to end I took a long break from reading it to stretch out the story for me I, no doubt, will read it again and again FANTASTIC PortsmouthJohn Jacob Turnstile ist gerade mal , ein Meister in Taschendiebstahl und so einigen anderen Gaunereien Sein Leben ndert sich schlagartig, als er eines Tages erwischt wird Doch statt im Gef ngnis, landet er auf der Bounty Unter Kapit n Bligh segeln sie in die S dsee, mit der Mission, auf Tahiti Setzlinge des Brotfruchtbaumes einzusammeln Ein Abenteuer, dessen Ausgang bekannt ist Hier aber wird die Geschichte erstmalig aus der Perspektive des Schiffsjungen erz hlt Die Ereignisse, Kapit n Bligh und seine Mannschaft erscheinem in einem komplett neuen Licht Es ist als w rde man von der Meuterei auf der Bounty zum ersten Mal h ren Spannend, aufw hlend und atemlosSie kennen die Geschichte der Meuterei auf der Bounty Der Schiffsjunge erz hlt sie neu, unerwartet und verbl ffend John Jacob Turnstile is fourteen and one of many boys living with the formidable Mr Lewis in Portsmouth, spending his days picking pockets and his nights in the upstairs rooms with the other pretty boys, doing things with wealthy men that give him nightmares Still, it s his life and has no plans to leave it, until the day that choice is taken out of his hands and made for him Caught lifting a French gentleman s pocket watch, he is taken before the magistrate and sentenced to twelve months gaol John Jacob Turnstile is fourteen and one of many boys living with the formidable Mr Lewis in Portsmouth, spending his days picking pockets and his nights in the upstairs rooms with the other pretty boys, doing things with wealthy men that give him nightmares Still, it s his life and has no plans to leave it, until the day that choice is taken out of his hands and made for him Caught lifting a French gentleman s pocket watch, he is taken before the magistrate and sentenced to twelve months gaol time A last second reprieve from the same French gentleman, Mr Z la, sees him instead aboard the HMS Bounty just before it leaves, to serve as ship boy and servant to the captain, William Bligh.Nursing vague plans of escaping somewhere along the voyage because Mr Lewis will be far from forgiving when he turns up in Portsmouth again Turnstile settles into life on board the ship, a whole new experience for the lad He learns that because it s a smaller kind of ship, it has no real captain, and Captain Bligh, as he is called, is really only a lieutenant, and this is something of a sore spot with him But Bligh nursed Turnstile through his three days of seasickness and for that alone, he has Turnstile s adoration and gratitude While he manages to eventually befriend or at least come to an understanding with the ship s crew, Turnstile is leery of the Master s Mate and third in command, Fletcher Christian, and one of the other officers, a pimply boy not much older than Turnstile called Mr Heywood There are tensions and outright arguments between the captain and his second in command, the ship s Master, Mr Fryer, an older, cautious and experienced man who is the voice of reason the captain is too often disdainful of.The Bounty is on an important mission, one the captain takes very seriously to reach Tahiti to acquire breadfruit seedlings, take them to the British colonies in the West Indies to be planted there so as to provide cheap and plentiful food for their slaves It is December 1787 when they set out from Portsmouth, and it takes them nearly a year to arrive at Otaheite what we call Tahiti where they stay for six months, cultivating seedlings and transplanting them into the pots they brought This island is a paradise for the crew, who take full advantage of a relaxed discipline to spend their new abundance of free time when not working on the transplanting with the pretty and sexually free women of the island Even Turnstile finds a girl to fall in love with The only man who has no interest in this leisure activity is Captain Bligh, who remains faithful to his wife Betsy.It is only when it is time to leave Tahiti that the real trouble begins, starting with three men deserting and a list turning up naming other sailors and officers along with the deserters But Bligh and Fryer don t see the list for what it really is a list of men the writer believed would stand against the captain in a mutiny For that is exactly what happens, a mutiny on one of King George s ships, and one of the Bounty s launch s a small boat merely twenty three feet long is put into the water with the captain and only eighteen loyal men inside, and one small locked box of food that would, under normal circumstances, barely last a day.Set adrift in the South Pacific, their chances of survival are dismal at best The one thing they have to their advantage is William Bligh himself he began his naval career as a highly skilled mapmaker and carries it all in his head still, plus they have a compass Now they have to ration and find hospitable islands to look for food and water, dodging cannibal natives as they go If they can make it to Timor, a Dutch settlement, they have a chance, but it takes 48 days to reach it and not everyone makes it alive Through it all, John Jacob Turnstile, the Captain s servant and loyal companion, narrates events from his own distinct and unique perspective, with his frank opinions and saucy cheek, creating an engaging and highly readable story out of one of the most famous and well documented mutinies in British history This is a modern take on an old piece of history, and having now read it I am mildly curious about the original, William Bligh s own take on what happened There is also Caroline Alexander s The Bounty , which focuses on the court martial of the ten mutineers captured some years later I can t make a comparison between John Boyne s interpretation of events and William Bligh s, though of course he used it as a source, but Boyne skilfully brought the voyage and the characters to life through the voice of John Jacob Turnstile Turnstile nicknamed Turnip by the crew has the cheek and sass of a low born petty thief from Portsmouth, nicely balanced with his own, largely under educated intelligence and an honourable character The realities of his life with Mr Lewis fill out his background and add extra depth to his character, as well as propelling him forward as a protagonist who is, in effect, a minor side character to a story much bigger than him This is Boyne s success and achievement using a character like Turnstile, who has no direct impact on events but is an eye witness to them, is a useful device in a story like this, but the challenge is in making him an interesting character in his own right, a character who isthan a pair of watchful eyes and perked up ears, a character you care about and want a bright future for Turnstile is just such a character, and without the strength of his voice, this would be a rather dull story.It is certainly a long one, at nearly five hundred pages, and quite detailed It has realism, a great deal of it, and is clearly well researched The details ring true and using a narrator who is new to life onboard a ship means we learn alongside Turnstile we are in the same position of ignorance as he is Reading this so soon after another book set in the South Pacific, Henderson s Spear though in a different time period , I learned a lot about the islands and their peoples as well as British colonial interests there.There were a couple of inconsistencies that disrupted the flow of the narrative for me at least One was the age at which Turnstile entered Mr Lewis s establishment at first he says he was five when he went to live with Mr Lewis, then later he s suddenly nine when the washerwoman who let him sleep on her floor sells him to Mr Lewis page 113 later he retells the story as Mr Lewis finding him when he s five, living on the streets 403 4 The other inconsistency was about Mr Samuel, the ship s clerk when Turnstile first tells us the names of the men who join the captain in the launch, he includes Mr Samuel page 337 he s mentioned again on page 405 as being with those loyal to the captain Later, in discussion with Mr Hall, the cook, they both share their negative opinions about Mr Samuel and express their lack of surprise that he joined the mutineers page 449 But when the Captain takes ship back to England, he takes with him Turnstile and Mr Samuel p.472 It s not a big detail, but they re such clear inconsistencies and they always serve to jolt me out of a story and make me second guess what I read previously.Without destroying Turnstile s admiration for Captain Bligh, Boyne manages to clearly convey the captain s flaws, especially in telling the story of Captain Cook s death in Hawaii as an Australian, we learn about Cook like Americans learn about Columbus I d always seen, in reenactments, and heard of his death as one by spears here he is overwhelmed and stabbed Bligh s temperament and flaws, as well as his positive points which are admirable, are subtly captured, and through Bligh we get the persuasive opinions of the time By the time we get Bligh s version of Captain Cook s death and the reasons behind it, which is not so subtle but still probably quite accurate for the era, we ve already got a pretty good opinion of the man You, sir I asked, wide eyed You went to retrieve the stolen boat Aye, in a way And had they surrendered it peacefully there would have been fewer consequences But as we approached the bay it became clear that there was no peace in store for us The natives were dotted along the tops of the cliffs, adopting war like stances and wearing the type of garb they felt would protect them from our cutlasses and muskets They were prepared for battle, that was clear to us all But why, Captain I asked him Had they turned against you I believe so, he replied At first all had been well, but they did not recognize our right to their land or their produce They were becoming belligerent about it We had no choice but to show our strength What rights, sir I asked, confused Our rights as emissaries of the king, Turnstile, he said, staring at me as if I was the worst kind of fool Isn t that clear They wanted us to leave them in peace Savages Ordering Englishmen away From their land You re missing the point, he insisted, as if the idea was a quite simple one It was no longer their land when we arrived We claimed it p.451 I m sure Bligh s opinions on the matter were standard, but I have to wonder whether Turnstile would have been so astute or modern in his own ideas on the matter.Overall, despite the length of the novel which was really longer than I would have liked to spend on board the Bounty, and despite the sometimes plodding pace, this was a story that kept me reading Being unfamiliar with the story, it wasn t immediately apparent who which officer or sailor, that is was behind the mutiny, though once things started happening on the island it became clear Still, reading about how it all came about was surprisingly engrossing, and their forty eight days of dogged survival and near death in the launch was the best part of all, in terms of engrossing reading I know, it sounds cruel that their suffering gave me the most enjoyment, but it really was the most gripping part of the story, precisely because the stakes were so high, the ending so uncertain yes, even though you know they make it back because Bligh writes his own version, but you re never sure who else makes it back or what they go through in the process Boyne s Mutiny on the Bounty is well worth reading, for the story, for the education, for the history, and it s clear why this story has continued to live on in our cultural heritage and imagination Once again, Boyne did not disappoint His clever wit combined with his topnotch writing creates the perfect story about Captain Bligh and his ship The Bounty I was mesmerized by his characters and felt like I was part of the crew as they sailed from Portsmouth to Tahiti The story is fascinating and full of adventure as told through the eyes of young John Jacob Turnstile Definitely recommend John Jacob Turnstile earns his living on the streets of Portsmouth as a petty thief He has no real life, no real friends, employed in the services of Mr Lewis and used periodically to feed the sexual desires of propertied gentlemen When the theft of a pocket watch leads to the arrest of young Master Turnstile it seems he is destined to spend a year incarcerated until an unexpected opportunity results in a change of fortune John Turnstile is informed that if he joins the crew of the Bounty, on John Jacob Turnstile earns his living on the streets of Portsmouth as a petty thief He has no real life, no real friends, employed in the services of Mr Lewis and used periodically to feed the sexual desires of propertied gentlemen When the theft of a pocket watch leads to the arrest of young Master Turnstile it seems he is destined to spend a year incarcerated until an unexpected opportunity results in a change of fortune John Turnstile is informed that if he joins the crew of the Bounty, on her mission to Otaheite, better known as Tahiti, he will on his return be a free man On the Bounty he is of little importance his main role attending to the whims and desires of none other than Captain William Bligh What follows is a rollicking adventure as we sail the high seas in the company of a motley crew including the infamous Christian Fletcher It of course comes as no surprise for me to tell you that a mutiny takes place and young Turnstile together with 18 crew members are set adrift in the Pacific ocean Every page of John Boyne s extraordinary novel bristles with the taste and feel of what it was like to sail the high seas at the end of the 18th century The crew faces the constant battering of inclement weather, the fear of pillaging pirates, and the threat of Scurvy, the disease of discovery, which ravaged both body and mind, and was caused by chronic vitamin C deficiency, brought on by lack of fresh fruit and vegetables In the second part of the book when the mutiny takes places our survivors, under the remarkable leadership of Bligh, cling to life on a minuscule diet in the hope that they can replenish and refuel at the numerous Polynesian islands in the vicinity of Tahiti This in turn leads to further turmoil when hostile inhabitants seem content on killing our brave sailors and cannibalizing their remains From the opening paragraph to the very satisfactory, poignant and just conclusion once again John Boyne has proved himself a master storyteller Every page of his fictional account but based on the known facts sparkles with energy and a vibrancy that is so often missing in writing today It is not only a boys own adventure but a beautiful coming of age story as John Turnstile uses opportunity offered to turn himself from a worthless street urchin into a man of some standing Readers and admirers of Boyne will be delighted at this change in direction, if the art of a storyteller can be measured in his ability to create a narrative and compose a picture out of any situation then surely John Boyne has no equal Wonderful colourful writing by one of my favourite authors and oh so highly recommended I ve known the story of The Mutiny on the Bounty for a long time, and I ve seen movie versions which give their own interpretation of what actually happened on that notorious and ill fated voyage, but the story John Boyne weaves around these actual events takes the tale to another level.He breathes life into the characters, vividly paints a picture of life on board, and gives his readers so much insight into what happened, andimportantly, why individuals acted as they did.This is undoubted I ve known the story of The Mutiny on the Bounty for a long time, and I ve seen movie versions which give their own interpretation of what actually happened on that notorious and ill fated voyage, but the story John Boyne weaves around these actual events takes the tale to another level.He breathes life into the characters, vividly paints a picture of life on board, and gives his readers so much insight into what happened, andimportantly, why individuals acted as they did.This is undoubtedly the best version of this story I ve ever come across, a great read full of action, humour, human feelings and failings, and lots of fascinating historical facts.another great read from a favourite author I love how Mr Boyne takes a well known event gives it a new spin and revives it into a most riveting iconic story of the sea, a sure sign of a very talented story teller.In a few words this is what happened to the ill fated ship After a long voyage on the high seas and a short stay on a sexy Polynesian paradise, the crew revolted, a mutiny led by Fletcher Christian erupted, the breadfruit laden Bounty was seized shortly after leaving Otaheite Tahiti in April 1789, and the captain, William Bl I love how Mr Boyne takes a well known event gives it a new spin and revives it into a most riveting iconic story of the sea, a sure sign of a very talented story teller.In a few words this is what happened to the ill fated ship After a long voyage on the high seas and a short stay on a sexy Polynesian paradise, the crew revolted, a mutiny led by Fletcher Christian erupted, the breadfruit laden Bounty was seized shortly after leaving Otaheite Tahiti in April 1789, and the captain, William Bligh, with his followers were set adrift in a boat to fight for their lives Miraculously the captain led his small screw back to England to a hero s welcome and the hunt for the mutineers began and those found were rounded up and tried in London.In this novel, the real life John Smith, Captain Bligh s steward, was replaced by John Jacob Turnstile, a fourteen year old street urchin who was given the choice of a year in the goal or taken service aboard the Bounty Through John Jacob s Turnip eyes we travel from the streets of Port Portmouth to a myriad of adventures His character is a brilliant creation with a charming sharp sense of humour and the most delightful egotistical narrator.This book is captivating, it is expertly written to describe with heart the sailing and those aboard the Bounty and with skill guides us during the 48 days the 23 foot launch held the starving men till they reached Timor It also deals with the sexual frustration of sailors at sea, the root of their mutiny after enjoying the delights of the native women and forced to return to the ship and leave them behind Mr Boyne style flows smoothly and allows for the most vivid, fresh images to filter into our mind Although I have a strong sense that historical record may have been modified to make this story the most enjoyable of fiction John Boyne is one of my favourite authors I have always enjoyed sea stories especially the Hornblower books and movies I wasn t sure if I would like this recording of the familiar story of the mutiny that took place on the Bounty as much as I did with it being so well known This book however is way up there among the best of anything I have previously read about the events It is a fresh take on the story and a fascinating read It is narrated by Captain Bligh s cabin boy John Boyne is an ac John Boyne is one of my favourite authors I have always enjoyed sea stories especially the Hornblower books and movies I wasn t sure if I would like this recording of the familiar story of the mutiny that took place on the Bounty as much as I did with it being so well known This book however is way up there among the best of anything I have previously read about the events It is a fresh take on the story and a fascinating read It is narrated by Captain Bligh s cabin boy John Boyne is an accomplished writer He really succeeds in bringing a story to life and this book is no exception There is clear evidence of meticulous research into the language and customs of the time His detailed description of life on board His Majesty s ships of that time is of a high standard I have never been disappointed by John Boyne s writing I was totally absorbed right from the first page and felt as if I was there, living the life among the sailors on board the ship as the story unfolded If you like adventure and sea stories you will enjoy this book I do and I highly recommend it Wow Incredible rethinking of The Mutiny on the Bounty This book filters everything you think you know through the eyes of a 14 year old narrator who is a little too wise to the ways of the world The voice of this kid was hilarious Imagine Charles Dickens telling you the story of the Bounty through the voice of The Artful Dodger Great, great book.


About the Author: John Boyne

John Boyne born 30 April 1971 in Dublin is an Irish novelist.He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, and studied Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia, where he won the Curtis Brown prize In 2015, he was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Letters by UEA.John Boyne is the author of ten novels for adults and five for young readers, as well as a collection of short stories His novels are published in over 50 languages The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas, which to date has soldthan 7 million copies worldwide, is a 1 New York Times Bestseller and a film adaptation was released in September 2008 Boyne resides in Dublin He is represented by the literary agent Simon Trewin at WME in London, United Kingdom.His most recent publication is the novel The Heart s Invisible Furies , published in the UK in February 2017 It will be published in the USA in August.


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