China in zehn Wörtern MOBI Ü China in Epub /


China in zehn Wörtern A remarkable collection of personal and cultural essays, framed around 10 Chinese words People, Leader, Reading, Writing, Lu Xun, Revolution, Disparity, Grassroots, Copycat, and Bamboozle Yu has a distinct voice, and his wit, satire, and humor come across in translation He recounts stories from his own childhood during the Cultural Revolution, his career as dentist doctor in rural regions, and his perspective on the rise of China on the world stage over the last 30 years Reading and Writing A remarkable collection of personal and cultural essays, framed around 10 Chinese words People, Leader, Reading, Writing, Lu Xun, Revolution, Disparity, Grassroots, Copycat, and Bamboozle Yu has a distinct voice, and his wit, satire, and humor come across in translation He recounts stories from his own childhood during the Cultural Revolution, his career as dentist doctor in rural regions, and his perspective on the rise of China on the world stage over the last 30 years Reading and Writing essays were the highlights of this collection on an emotional level, however each essay was crafted with such care that they are all very memorable, and educational.Recommended without reservation for anyone interested in learningabout modern China, and who appreciates strong writing and skill in translation Much of the book will be familiar to anyone who pays attention to China, but Yu Hua has a knack for choosing just the right anecdotes to illustrate his points and doing so with an economy and directness missing from his most recent novel, Brothers He s back on form here, and is very well served by Allan H Barr s excellent translation Anyone with an interest in contemporary China will want to read this and to recommend it to any friends or family members looking to get up to speed qu Much of the book will be familiar to anyone who pays attention to China, but Yu Hua has a knack for choosing just the right anecdotes to illustrate his points and doing so with an economy and directness missing from his most recent novel, Brothers He s back on form here, and is very well served by Allan H Barr s excellent translation Anyone with an interest in contemporary China will want to read this and to recommend it to any friends or family members looking to get up to speed quickly and pleasurably 3.5 stars After living in rural China for a few years I lost interest in taking any look intimate or otherwise at the Chinese experience I m still not very motivated to read about the Great Leap Forward or the Cultural Revolution or anything that followed I exhausted my interestor at least I thought Hua s book is really pretty great, especially for readers who aren t very familiar with recent Chinese history Hua s lived through it all and has a great talent for essay construction The 3.5 stars After living in rural China for a few years I lost interest in taking any look intimate or otherwise at the Chinese experience I m still not very motivated to read about the Great Leap Forward or the Cultural Revolution or anything that followed I exhausted my interestor at least I thought Hua s book is really pretty great, especially for readers who aren t very familiar with recent Chinese history Hua s lived through it all and has a great talent for essay construction The best aspect of this book, though, is the translation Having read quite a bit of Chinese lit in translation it often feels stale and rigidbut Hua s book flows beautifully Kudos to Allan H Barr This is a truly remarkable book for its depth of feeling, simplicity, humour and elegance I can say without hyperbole is one of the most memorable I ve ever picked up As the title suggests, the author uses 10 words to describe China as he s experienced it in his life and through this he paints an enthralling picture of a country travelling the path of upheaval and revolution to its present state.Through words like People , Reading , Copycat , the author provides vignettes of his own life e This is a truly remarkable book for its depth of feeling, simplicity, humour and elegance I can say without hyperbole is one of the most memorable I ve ever picked up As the title suggests, the author uses 10 words to describe China as he s experienced it in his life and through this he paints an enthralling picture of a country travelling the path of upheaval and revolution to its present state.Through words like People , Reading , Copycat , the author provides vignettes of his own life experiences At times they are hilarious and at times sad and remarkably sometimes they manage to be both without cruelty Throughout this the author drops gems of wisdom about the human condition as he s encountered it which are deeply humbling His own life story is used to explicate the travails of his country, and the stuff of daily life describes the incredible political and social developments China has experienced over the past half century.The depth of change China has experienced in its past few decades has few precedents in modern history A country with an ancient, self assured culture was completely torn asunder first by colonialism, then by political radicalism, and then finally by the freemarket fundamentalism which reigns today This book tells that story through the life of its author, who grew up during the violent and often bizarre upheavals of the Cultural Revolution, and now surveys the capitalist China which he finds around him today.This book is very special Short, beautiful, deep, and rendered in exceptionally beautiful prose, its tells the story of a grand history on a micro level and does so in a way which is both moving and wise Not only that, it also manages to convey all this while being frequently hilarious I was laughing at loud intermittently throughout Recommended unreservedly whether you re interested in China, the human condition in general, or just like good writing I ll admit to being something of China geek I try to keep up with whatever is being published about this fascinating country and culture Yu Hua s book is one of my favorite recent finds His book consists of ten essays based on ten words that he considers relevant to contemporary China The essays are partly memoir, partly history, and partly social commentary His childhood and teenage remembrances of China during the Cultural Revolution are especially helpful to understanding how it is that I ll admit to being something of China geek I try to keep up with whatever is being published about this fascinating country and culture Yu Hua s book is one of my favorite recent finds His book consists of ten essays based on ten words that he considers relevant to contemporary China The essays are partly memoir, partly history, and partly social commentary His childhood and teenage remembrances of China during the Cultural Revolution are especially helpful to understanding how it is that the entire country seemed to have descended into a state of brutality and chaos for a period of ten years 1966 to 1976 In the words disparity, copycat and bamboozle, Yu brings us up to contemporary times He explains some of the contemporary thinking and behaviors in Chinese people as exemplified by these particular words At the same time, he connects these words to the current national devotion to cut throat capitalism and the moral vacuum accompanying this devotion and its origins in the Cultural Revolution Yu Hua is a novelist, author of To Live made into an unforgettable film by director Zhang Yimou , and as such, writes with elegant simplicity and heartfelt warmth, not to mention a real sense of humor This is a very readable work, and very helpful in understanding the past 50 years of Chinese history If the reader already knows something about this historical period, the book will be evenmeaningful If the reader does not, the books is so well written and so full of humanity that it s worth the time to read it The translation is excellent as well By the way, the Chinese naming convention is to put the family name first, then the personal name In this case Yu is the family name Someone here on Goodreads switched this to suit western naming conventions by listing the author as Hua Yu I regret that this happened The author s name is Yu Hua In the political context of 1989, for a government leader to be hospitalized could mean only that he had lost power or that he had gone into hiding Everyone immediately understood the implications What other political figure would make a point of waving to his people in a swimsuit Only Mao could carry this off Leadership contests even extend to geography and technology, so that now we have leaders in natural scenery and leaders among elevators Many Chinese have begun to pine for the era In the political context of 1989, for a government leader to be hospitalized could mean only that he had lost power or that he had gone into hiding Everyone immediately understood the implications What other political figure would make a point of waving to his people in a swimsuit Only Mao could carry this off Leadership contests even extend to geography and technology, so that now we have leaders in natural scenery and leaders among elevators Many Chinese have begun to pine for the era of Mao Zedong, but I think the majority of them don t really want to go back in time and probably just feel nostalgic On the bowls out of which we ate our rice was printed Mao s maxim Revolution is not a dinner party, Mao s image was stenciled inside toilets, and sayings of his decorated our spittoons Now I realize that these were two places where Mao clearly did not belong, but in those days, strange as it seems, this point escaped us What left the deepest impression on me from the National Day newsreels was the pryrotechnics display that took place after nightfall, when Mao and his colleagues sat down at a table so groaning with fruits and pastries it made my mouth drool Fireworks illuminated the square as brightly as day for me as a boy this was the most exhilarating scene of all If it had been just a few people weeping, I would certainly have felt sad, but a thousand people all weeping at the same time simply struck me as funny The students have eaten all the leaves off the tress We began to argue, an activity known at the time as civil struggle We sat with our heads together an exciting way to read and before we were a third of the way through, we were already sighing in wonder In those days, to tear big character posters off the walls would have counted as counterrevolutionary activity, so new posters had to be stuck on top of old ones and walls became thicker and thicker, as though our town were swathed in an oversized padded jacket Although I failed to find very explicit sexual details, the associations it conjured up in my mind were enough to set my heart racing, like a little boat bobbing about on the sea What they asked, a quaver in their voices She can t sit down, I said mysteriously Why not they gasped Why not I didn t have a clue either But that didn t stop me from telling them with airy condescension, Once you get married, you ll understand why not In the summer the pond gave off a sickening stench, and flies settled on it so thickly one might think it had been covered with a black wool carpet We were fishers of memory, sitting on the banks of time and waiting for the past to swallow the bait And so editors were conscientiously reading unsolicited manuscripts as soon as they stumbled on something good, they would pass it around among themselves, and the whole editorial department would get excited My scheme had succeeded through bribery, we would say today or through a sugar coated bullet, as we would have put it then On my first day of work I made a point of showing up two hours late, only to discover I was the first to arrive I knew then this was just the place for me Like the sky washed clean after a storm, this new Lu Xun was fresh and radiant Some supported him and some supported me, and the boys in our year were soon divided into two camps the Earth Destruction School and the Earth Survival School The Cultural Revolution had entered its final stages and life continued in its straightjacket as everyone s apathy deepened it also recorded my existential predicament in the final stages of the Cultural Revolution, a life made up of equal parts stifled instincts, dreary freedom, and hollow verbiage You don t know shit, they would say You lot need to wait till you re in middle school to know what revolution is Now and again he would play the tune of a peddler hawking pear syrup candy, which would induce us younger kids to come running in his directions, eager for a treat Seeing our chagrin at having been duped, he would chortle with amusement, then revert to his customary silence The weak fear the strong, the strong fear the violent, and the violent fear the reckless We regrouped and charged after him, shouting, we ll teach you who s boss now As we raced through the streets, in no time at all we were dripping with sweat, and in order to maintain speed and avoid getting winded, we soon abbreviated our battle cry to the snappier Who s boss Right and wrong often coexist in a single phenomenon and interact in a dynamic of mutual displacement You ve all been fetching water for the old lady next door for ten years already, he said, rapping on the pile of essays stacked on his desk Why don t you change your example once in a while How about fetching a sack of rice for the old man next door That is the real tragedy poverty and hunger are not as shocking as willful indifference to them Among prospective blood vendors he was known simply as Blood Chief, and he exercised unquestioned authority over his empire of blood This is my Blackberry, Obama tells us with a grin, The Blockberry Whirlwind 9500 This real life sex entrepreneur copycat party secretary has also imported the Communist Party s advanced worker category into his management structure, electing every month an advanced worker who has distinguished herself in terms of the number of clients serviced and adding her photograph to the array of top earners listed in the honor roll In some bustling neighborhood they would unfurl and oilskin umbrella and spread out on a table their forceps, mallets, and other tools of their trade, along with a row of teeth they had extracted, as a way of attracting customers Dentists in those days operated as one man bands and needed no helper Our patients, mostly peasants from the surrounding countryside, did not think of our clinic as a health care facility but simply called it the tooth shop From one of China s most acclaimed writers, his first work of nonfiction to appear in English a unique, intimate look at the Chinese experience over the last several decades, told through personal stories and astute analysis that sharply illuminate the country s meteoric economic and social transformation Framed by ten phrases common in the Chinese vernacular people, leader, reading, writing, Lu Xun one of the most influential Chinese writers of the twentieth century , disparity, revolution, grassroots, copycat, and bamboozle China in Ten Words reveals as never before the world s most populous yet oft misunderstood nation In Disparity, for example, Yu Hua illustrates the mind boggling economic gaps that separate citizens of the country In Copycat, he depicts the escalating trend of piracy and imitation as a creative new form of revolutionary action And in Bamboozle, he describes the increasingly brazen practices of trickery, fraud, and chicanery that are, he suggests, becoming a way of life at every level of society Characterized by Yu Hua s trademark wit, insight, and courage, China in Ten Words is a refreshingly candid vision of the Chinese miracle and all its consequences, from the singularly invaluable perspective of a writer living in China today From the Hardcover edition The book succeeds in giving a quick glimpse of contemporary China, while it s not equally satisfying in finding the cause The Cultural Revolution is not the only root for today s chaos And in this chaos there are still hopes and positive attitudes Some parts of the book read like just a collection of stories, impressive yet also being used to simplify the problems Anyway, with merely a littlethan 200 pages, it could not be better than serving as an appetizer. Yu Hua s China in Ten Words was assigned by the class I was taking, Non Western Literature After reading books by authors in Africa and India, we wrapped up the course by reading this first hand account of China throughout the years.I ll be honest and say this memoir is amazingly written and very telling My only issue is that I don t understand China I told my instructor a few times The Cultural Revolution makes no sense, the Tiananmen Square incident was awful and I don t unders Yu Hua s China in Ten Words was assigned by the class I was taking, Non Western Literature After reading books by authors in Africa and India, we wrapped up the course by reading this first hand account of China throughout the years.I ll be honest and say this memoir is amazingly written and very telling My only issue is that I don t understand China I told my instructor a few times The Cultural Revolution makes no sense, the Tiananmen Square incident was awful and I don t understand why copying other people or their products copycat section is a form of revolution As a matter of fact, I just don t understand revolutions that put you in a worse place than before Seriously the Cultural Revolution was a sad, crazy, ironic time and I want nothing to do with China s history any I unabashedly admit, I don t understand China Regardless, Yu Hua tried his best to help people like me understand I promise China in Ten Words is extremely interesting and well written I would love to read other work by this author I think knowing what I know of his past in China and how that country went through a dozen transitions over the last 60 years might make me appreciate his fiction.Until next timehappy readings This book might ve surprised many people by its blunt outlook on the Chinese way of life China is not the best country to live in, that s for sure But it s becoming better and better every single year Chinese people are not the paragon of human virtues But This book might ve surprised many people by its blunt outlook on the Chinese way of life China is not the best country to live in, that s for sure But it s becoming better and better every single year Chinese people are not the paragon of human virtues But who else is Aren t we all fucked up in some way


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